Recent Press

What to do in Oklahoma on June 2, 2018: Oklahoma Contemporary opening new exhibit by Japanese artist Chiyoko Myose

NewsOK

Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 3000 General Pershing Blvd., will host this summer a solo exhibition of fiber installations by Chiyoko Myose, a Japanese artist who has been living in Wichita, Kansas, for the past 20 years.

With her works, Myose expresses her experiences of living in a foreign country; she considers herself as a sojourner, a person who stays in one place temporarily, like a traveler.

Titled “Sojourning,” the exhibit will open with an event from 3 to 6 p.m. today. It will include four installation pieces with a common theme of “relationship,” from relationships between individuals to those between countries, along with a piece that invites members of the community to contribute to the artwork by tying knots with threads. In addition, “Sojourning” will feature a new work created especially for Oklahoma Contemporary.

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Read full article here.

Additional Chiyoko Myose coverage:

Oklahoma Contemporary ‘Sojourning’ with Japanese artist, Metro Library System offering free summer entertainment, and hoofers dancing into inaugural OKC Tap Fest
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

June Must-Dos
405 Magazine

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2018 Achievers Under 40 honorees selected

The Journal Record

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Jeremiah Davis aims to change the art work in Oklahoma City.

"One major goal of mine is to increase access to arts education for Oklahomans of all ages in order to inspire the peoples of our state to unlock their creative potential to build a strong, innovative, creative and economically vibrant future," he explains.

A strong believer in the power of education, Davis holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Columbia University in dramaturgy and script development. He has extensive work experience in New York City's theater industry that spans almost a decade. In 2016, Davis returned to Oklahoma to be the artistic director for Oklahoma Contemporary.

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Making moves: Oklahoma Contemporary officially begins construction on its new art facility.

Oklahoma Gazette

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The new art center at NW 11th Street and N. Broadway Avenue was designed by architect Rand Elliott and will be built by Smith & Pickel Construction. The new location expands Oklahoma Contemporary’s current exhibition space by more than 20,000 square feet, along with across-the-board structural and technological improvements.

When complete, the facility will positively impact Oklahoma Contemporary’s ability to fulfill its art and community mission, which is to “encourage artistic expression in all of its forms through exhibitions, education and performance.”

Davis said the new building does not fully alter its established mission, but it will grow it.

“I think our mission is evolving or expanding,” he said. “It’s not necessarily changing or moving in a different direction.”

Read full article here.

Additional Folding Light coverage:

Construction Starts on Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Oklahoma Contemporary begins construction on New Downtown Arts Center
KOKH FOX25

OK Contemporary Begins New Space
405 Magazine

Oklahoma Contemporary starts construction of arts center
The Journal Record

Construction Starts on Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center
News On 6

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Word Balloons: Oklahoma Contemporary to close comics art show with convention

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Oklahoma comics artists, including Arigon Starr, Melanie Gillman, Jerry Bennett, Dorshak Bloch, Johnnie Diacon and Natasha Alterici, have had their work on display, as have more than a dozen artists chosen from an open call: Kent Clark, Tony Thunder, Steve Hill, Laura McPheeters, Jeremy Nelson, Kyle Van Osdol, Brent Learned, Shyanne Tilley, Justin Stier, Mandy Steward, Garrett Young, John Eric Osborn, Cassandra Peters, Tyler Kelting and Danny Rose III.

The exhibit will close this weekend with a comics convention, called ContempCon, with an artistic bent, as Oklahoma Contemporary offers free admission and dozens of comics-related panels.

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Read full article here.

Additional Comix OK coverage:

Comix OK to look at Oklahoma's comics culture
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

10 Comic Book Characters with Okie Roots
The Lost Ogle

Contemporary Arts
The Comic Book Literacy Blog

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Spring Break Is an Oasis for Art Fair Haters

Hyperallergic

During Armory Week, people like to gripe about art fairs. There’s a certain art world cred that comes with the disdain people demonstrate towards the realities of the art gallery system being laid bare. The Spring/Break fair is different, not because of the way the art is presented (though that’s somewhat true), but more because of the spirit of this scrappy affair that appears to prize quirky projects that often fall outside the purview of more commercial ventures. Whether you’re seeking a rainbow KKK robe (see Jeffrey Songco), giant Cheetos-looking sculptures (paging Andy Harman), a contemporary take on Judith and Holofernes (um, Rebecca Morgan), or Islamic-inspired tile work with penises (Hossein Edalatkhah’s got something you can look at) you can find it here.

The experience may be overwhelming but the location of the fair in the old Condé Nast offices (currently administered by Chashama) overlooking Times Square is an excellent way to see this part of the city through the office windows all around.

Wander the halls and see mostly independent curator-led projects — some galleries and nonprofits sneaked in — and enjoy the energy that feels like a blend of an open studio event and a more conventional art fair.

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Bryce Zackery's "300 Dollar Man" (2018), which was a special project curated by Equity Gallery and Oklahoma Contemporary

Read full article here.

Additional Spring/Break Art Show coverage:

A Tour of the 2018 Spring/Break Art Show
ARTnews

Spring/Break Art Show Announces Seventh Edition Venue and Curators
ARTFORUM

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Celebrating 'The Other Mozart'

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

While touring the apartment of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Vienna, Austria, the musician-turned-actress spied the portrait featuring the dramatically coiffed woman sitting next to the composer at a keyboard, their hands intertwined as they played together.

“You don’t see women, especially in those times, featured like that. So, I wanted to know who this was, and underneath it said, ‘The Portrait of the Mozart Family.’ So, I was really stunned, and I looked it up right away: Who is this? It’s just such a fascinating story for us not to know about her,” Milo said in a recent phone interview from her New York home.

Along with the iconic composer and the family patriarch, the painting depicts Wolfgang’s older sister Anna Maria, affectionately known as “Nannerl,” a fellow musical prodigy, keyboard virtuoso and composer who has been all but forgotten.

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Additional The Other Mozart coverage:

Forgotten Daughters; The Other Mozart kicks off Oklahoma Contemporary's Women in Performance series
Oklahoma Gazette

Oklahoma Contemporary launches Women in Performance series with The Other Mozart
Ion Oklahoma

OKC arts center to begin 'Women in Performance' series with play about Mozart's sister
OU Daily

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Newly launched Oklahoma Latino Cultural Center co-hosting mariachi festival

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

“I think this is a great opportunity for people from all sorts of different backgrounds and different communities to be able to experience something together, to be able to experience the richness of music and art that we have here in Oklahoma and enjoy some visiting artists, as well. At the same time, they'll be able to support the growth of those art forms here in Oklahoma,” said Robert Ruiz, founder of Oklahoma City's Anita Martinez Mariachi Festival.

The second Anita Martinez Mariachi Festival begins Thursday night at the Oklahoma City Community College Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater with a gala concert. It will continue through Feb. 10 at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center with a student art exhibition, mariachi master class and more.

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Additional Anita Martinez Mariachi Festival coverage:

Mariachi festival promotes pride, prepares Hispanic youth
Oklahoma City Free Press

What to do in Oklahoma on Feb. 10, 2018: Check out the mariachi-theme Make-and-Take artmaking activity at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Community Focus: Making art accessible in Oklahoma City
KOKH FOX25

What to do in Oklahoma in Feb. 1, 2018: See Mariachi Campanas de America at the gala concert opening the Anita Martinez Mariachi Festival
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Community Focus: New opportunities for artists of color in Oklahoma
KOKH FOX25

Around Town: Mariachi Festival coming to town
The Journal Record

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Interviews, photos and video: Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center celebrates state's current art scene with ArtNow 2018

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Just as the eyes become the windows to the soul in portraits of people, the windows and doors provide entry in more ways than one into Dean Wilhite’s vivid paintings of vintage places.

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“I don’t know why I’m drawn so much to windows and doors. But it seems like the windows and doors that I paint are the portrait of a building – not the whole building, but the most important part. A lot of times they can be a specific building, but most of the time, they’re just any building. They’re something that ties me back to old Oklahoma towns, small towns, places where my grandparents and my parents came from,” the Oklahoma City artist said, studying his painting of the old Oklahoma City Union Bus Station that was demolished in 2015.



ArtNow 2018

Uncovering Oklahoma

Oklahoma Contemporary’s signature ArtNow celebrates Oklahoma’s vibrant contemporary art community. The exhibition, which opened today, provides a snapshot of Oklahoma’s diverse art scene. The exhibit wraps up with an art sale, the “party with a purpose” on January 19, 2018.

For this year’s exhibition, Curatorial and Exhibitions Director Jennifer Scanlan and guest curator Alyson Atchison have chosen 25 artists across many media, from jewelry and sculpture to printmaking and painting.

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See full video online here.

Additional ArtNow 2018 coverage:

5 Reasons to go to ArtNow at Oklahoma Contemporary
The Lost Ogle

Jayme Phillips, Jennifer Scanlan, Kirsten Griffin---ArtNow---Oklahoma Contemporary Arts---Parties Extra!
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

CU Professor's Art On Sale at State's Contemporary Arts Center On Friday
The Lawton Constitution

ArtNow Explores the New
405 Magazine

Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center: Art Now
KOKH FOX25

Around Town: Contemporary art show ends Jan. 19
The Journal Record

Diverse styles seen in 'ArtNow'
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center's ArtNow celebrating state's creative climate
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

The Scouted Calendar / January 2018
The Scout Guide

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Oklahoma Gazette‘s Forty Under 40 Class of 2017

Oklahoma Gazette

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“Luke is one of the most talented designers I’ve had the privilege to work with,” said Oklahoma Contemporary director of communications Lori Brooks. “He’s embraced our mission of providing accessible, inclusive arts experiences to everyone, regardless of socio-economic status.”

Atkinson is vice president of Sunbeam Family Services’ young professionals board, Beacons, and he helped organize its first fundraiser, the Glow For It bowling tournament.

“My personal mission is to improve our community by elevating those less fortunate into positions of equal opportunity,” Atkinson said.

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Keever tops Readers' Choice poll 

OKC FRIDAY

With 30 write-in votes, Donna Rinehart Keever, executive director of Oklahoma Contemporary, topped OKC FRIDAY’s Readers’ Choice poll for the Most Powerful Woman in OKC.

Tricia Everest and Judy Love came in second and third respectively, consistent with the newspaper’s poll of 300 community leaders. Meg Salyer, who was No. 1 in the regular poll, was ranked third by readers. Christy Everest ranked fifth in both polls. Polly Nichols was sixth in the Readers Choice and seventh in the overall poll.

Readers chose Nancy Anthony as No. 7. In the overall poll, she was ranked No. 25. Jari Askins came in at No. 8 in the Readers Choice and No. 21 in the poll of community leaders. Rounding out the Top 10 in Readers Choice were Gov. Mary Fallin at No. 9 and Linda Cavanaugh at No. 10.

Also, receiving ranking high in the Readers Choice poll were:
Teresa Rose Crook, Liz Eickman, Kelly Dyer Fry, Ann Hargis, Rita Aragon, Sody Clements, Ann Felton Gilliland, Debby Hampton, Willa Johnson, Marnie Taylor, Miki Farris and Cynda Ottaway.
Also, Sue Ann Arnall, Jose Freede, Noma Gurich, Rhonda Hooper, Jane Jayroe-Gamble, Yvonne Kauger, Lou Kerr, Aurora Lora, Vicki Miles-LaGrange, Jan Peery, Kari Watkins, Joy Hofmeister and Susan Chambers.

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Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center exhibit 'Not For Sale' explores state's graffiti culture

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Despite his obvious skill, eye for detail and command of color, one of the last places Robert Levering ever expected to see one of his paintings is on the wall of an art gallery.

“It's awesome. I'm smiling ear to ear. I walk in and I see everybody's piece and just everybody representing themselves, but we all come together and represent Oklahoma,” he said, standing under the massive and realistic rendering of a snarling gorilla.

“It's an amazing thing that the Oklahoma Contemporary has done for us where we could come in and actually paint on their walls. It's just amazing. I love it.”

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See the full story online here.


Local Graffiti Culture Finds New Audience At Oklahoma Contemporary

KGOU

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Like other artists in the show, Kanaly has turned his graffiti experience into a career. He studied graphic design in college, and works as a creative director at an advertising agency in downtown Oklahoma City. Now that he’s 40 years old, tagging illegally no longer has the same appeal.

“I'm a dad and a family man and I have a good career going. I don't want to screw any of that,” he said.

But Kanaly still gets commissions for graffiti-style murals. He sees the influence the art form has had on street art and public spaces around the world. He thinks graffiti will never go away, whether or not it’s illegal.

“It's in human nature to mark the places that we've been to, especially if we feel like it was a monumental achievement to get there,” he said.

See the full story online here.

Additional Not For Sale coverage: 

What to do in Oklahoma on Nov. 27, 2017: See the exhibit 'Not for Sale: Graffiti Culture in Oklahoma' before it closes at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

'Not For Sale' at Oklahoma Contemporary is a dope exhibit
The Lost Ogle

Adventures at Guthrie Haunts and Not For Sale
Uncovering Oklahoma

Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center opens 'Not For Sale' graffiti exhibit
OU Daily

Oklahoma Contemporary Museum: 'Not For Sale: Graffiti Culture in Oklahoma'
KOKH FOX25

Oklahoma Contemporary brings street art indoors with Not For Sale: Graffiti Culture in Oklahoma
Oklahoma Gazette

Coming, 'Not For Sale: Graffiti Culture in Oklahoma'
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Around Town: Local artists do graffiti
The Journal Record

Not For Sale
Uncovering Oklahoma

Around Town: Contemporary art is popular
The Journal Record

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Interviews, photos and videos: 'Coded_Couture' exhibit at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center weaves fashion and technology

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

From a miniskirt that broadcasts tweets to jewelry that literally grows on the wearer, Oklahoma Contemporary’s new exhibit “Coded_Couture” explores the possibilities of future fashion through the works of 10 international designers. Powered by Google, the interactive exhibition is on view through Aug. 14.

“‘Coded_Couture’ really looks at the intersection of fashion and technology and considers the ways in which technology can be used to personalize clothing. The idea of couture comes from haute couture, which would be clothing that is especially designed for one person’s body. This has been going on for centuries, of course; you think of elegant men’s suits that are specifically designed for their bodies or beautiful high-fashion dresses,” Scanlan said. “What the curators of this exhibition did was think about the ways that technology can be used in the same way, to create a garment that corresponds exactly to the individual. And they look at this through many different lenses.”

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See the full story online here.

Additional CODED_COUTURE coverage: 

FutureFashion
Uncovering Oklahoma

Computer Couture at Oklahoma Contemporary: A techonology-forward fashion exhibition
405 Magazine

Oklahoma Contemporary’s Coded_Couture merges art, fashion and technology
Oklahoma Gazette

What to do in Oklahoma on July 10, 2017: Check out 'Coded_Couture' at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center
NewsOK

Review: Art, fashion, interactivity intersect in exhibit
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Around Town: Forward-looking fashion
The Journal Record

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Parties, Etc.: Sunday, July 2, 2017: Helen Ford Wallace

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

A new event, The Art of Brunch, from Oklahoma Contemporary, was highly successful. It had a sellout crowd, (over 300 people); was held outdoors at Campbell Art Park, NW 11 and Broadway, on a beautiful Saturday morning; featured a variety of specialty dishes, including oatmeal banana pancakes, stuffed French toast, ham and cheese biscuits (all great brunch items); and had party favors of white, yellow and hot pink parasols for all the guests (to shield them from the summer sun).

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Read the full story online here.

Additional The Art of Brunch coverage: 

The Art of Brunch kicks off a new exhibition with a gourmet outdoor meal
Oklahoma Gazette

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Interviews & photos: Native artist Jeffrey Gibson talks about his multimedia exhibit 'Speak to Me' at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center

The Oklahoman/NewsOK

He may be of Choctaw and Cherokee heritage, but Gibson’s exhibition “Speak to Me,” a multimedia show fusing sculpture, fiber art, beadwork, ceramics and video on view at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, spells out an array of cultural influences -- sometimes quite literally, as many of his wall hangings and standing sculptures incorporate lyrics from pop hits, gospel songs and rap music.

In other words, viewers shouldn’t expect him to stay in his own lane, so to speak, when it comes to creating his vivid, abstract works of art.

“I actually understand the purpose of lanes and categorization. I think it’s actually very helpful in many ways for learning and communicating. … What I started thinking was that as an artist, if you begin to identify as an artist, I want to take advantage of everything that that allows. And probably one of the very first things is that you don’t have lanes,” he said during a private tour of his Oklahoma City exhibit.

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Read the full story online here.

 

Native American art and multimedia are put on display in Jeffrey Gibson’s new Oklahoma Contemporary exhibit

Oklahoma Gazette

Jeffrey Gibson finds inspiration in everything from song lyrics to inanimate objects. It’s what prompted the title for his solo exhibition Speak to Me, on display through June 11 at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 3000 General Pershing Blvd.

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“I use appropriated language such as song lyrics, poetry, writers who have influenced me, and I’ve also always been drawn to hymns,” said Gibson, a multimedia artist who works with painting, sculpture, fiber, ceramics, video and performance.

He features this appropriated language, along with his own words, on pieces that include everything from beaded panels to sculpture. His interest in spiritual hymns comes from his grandfathers, both of whom established Native American churches.

See the full story online here.

Additional Jeffrey Gibson coverage: 

What to do in Oklahoma on June 6, 2017: See Jeffrey Gibson's 'Speak to Me' before it closes at Oklahoma Contemporary
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Making Pow Wow Regalia Raw Materials Into Modern Traditional Art
Indian Country Media Network

Artist's multimedia show raises questions
The Oklahoman/NewsOK

Curator Tour of Jeffrey Gibson's Speak to Me at Oklahoma Contemporary
Uncovering Oklahoma

NATIVE NOUVEAU: Artist Jeffrey Gibson’s multi-media works exhibit at Oklahoma Contemporary
Red Dirt Report

What to do in Oklahoma on Feb. 20, 2017: See Jeffrey Gibson's 'Speak to Me' exhibit at Oklahoma Contemporary
NewsOK

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Moving to Midtown

SPLURGE! Magazine OKC

For more than 25 years, Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center has encouraged artistic expression and education at the Oklahoma City Fairgrounds location, but now it has the opportunity to create a new arts education and cultural resource in downtown Oklahoma City.

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Oklahoma Contemporary, supported by the Kirkpatrick Foundation, is building a new state-of-the-art center on a 4.6 acre site at NW 11th and Broadway in Midtown. The new four-story 50,000-square-foot building will include classrooms to support art study in everything from painting and fiber arts to high-tech new media expression like animation.

Read the full story online here.

Additional Folding Light coverage:

Oklahoma Contemporary Breaks Ground

The Oklahoman

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New arts campus for Oklahoma Contemporary on its way
Oklahoma Gazette

Parties, Etc.: Groundbreaking Ceremony
The Oklahoman

Oklahoma Contemporary coming out of the ground with gusto, Folds of Light
OKC Friday

Around town: Contemporary Construction
The Journal Record

Oklahoma Contemporary breaks ground on campus near downtown Oklahoma City
NewsOK

Oklahoma Contemporary to break ground, expand art, culture in OKC
Edmond Sun

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